Eerie, by Blake Crouch

Eerie

On a crisp autumn evening in 1980, seven-year-old Grant Moreton and his five-year-old sister Paige were nearly killed in a mysterious accident in the Cascade Mountains that left them orphans. It’s been thirty years since that night. Grant is now a detective with the Seattle Police Department and long estranged from his sister. But his investigation into the bloody past of a high-class prostitute has led right to Paige’s door, and what awaits inside is beyond his wildest imagining. His only hope of survival and saving his sister will be to confront the terror that inhabits its walls, but he is completely unprepared to face the truth of what haunts his sister’s brownstone.

I was looking for some light reading – something with easily digestible chapters. I came across Eerie by Blake and Jordan Crouch. I don’t normally read horror fiction or watch horror movies because they all seem to be gory hack-fests. Occasionally, a book is recommended to me from the horror genre and I give it a whirl. Oftentimes it is better than I expect. With Eerie, I am finding the book to be much better than most horror books. I gauge how scary a movie is by how unnerved I am after going to bed. Rarely has a book achieved this – but Eerie most certainly has. Give Eerie a shot – I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Blake-Crouch

Blake Crouch has sold over a million books and his work has been translated into more than twenty languages. Known for high-concept fiction with breakneck pacing and groundbreaking genre cross-breeding, six of his books have hit the Kindle Top 10, and two have reached the #1 spot. His short fiction has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, including Alfred Hitchcock, Ellery Queen, Cemetery Dance, and Thriller 2, edited by Clive Cussler.

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About Mark Gardner

Mark Gardner lives in northern Arizona with his wife, three children and a pair of spoiled dogs. Mark holds a degrees in Computer Systems and Applications and Applied Human Behavior. View all posts by Mark Gardner

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